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Scientists have discovered a new way of detecting zinc in zebra fish, that could pave the way for furthering our understanding of diseases like type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer and Alzheimer’s.

Zinc is found throughout the body and involved in many metabolic pathways that affect the function of the immune system and brain, reproduction, and sexual development.

It is also increasingly recognised as a key element in the treatment of a range of diseases, for example type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. It’s unclear whether zinc is a cause of disease, or if it’s employed to prevent its development or progression, and there is great interest in developing a molecular probe which can detect zinc in the body.

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TAIPEI, Taiwan — A giant panda, one of a pair presented by China four years ago to mark warming ties with Taiwan, has given birth to a female cub at a Taipei zoo, officials said Sunday.

The 9-year-old Yuan Yuan delivered the cub Saturday night, following artificial insemination given in March, the zoo announced.

It was the seventh such attempt on Yuan Yuan in three years, they said. Natural pregnancy among pandas is relatively rare.
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A pioneering programme in Scotland is encouraging young offenders to train rescued dogs, ready for rehoming. from Polmont training rescue dogs from the nearby Dogs Trust West Calder rehoming centre.

Paws for Progress runs in eight week cycles and each one sees a small group of prisoners from HM Young Offender Institute (HMYOI) Polmont take part in three training sessions each week, two of these with rescue dogs.

As well as working with the dogs, the participants learn team working and social skills, while some become volunteer assistants and peer mentors for the programme. The aim is to help offenders address their behaviour and develop employment skills in preparation for release.

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JAKARTA — Young Indonesians are breathing new life into their polluted concrete capital city with little more than buckets of soil and seeds.

A group of mostly young professionals, known as Gardening Indonesia, has joined the global urban farming movement, converting vacant patches of land between Jakarta’s skyscrapers into lush green vegetable gardens.

“There’s concrete, concrete, everywhere. But if we look hard enough, there is vacant land we can farm,” said Sigit Kusumawijaya, 30, watering freshly planted tomato seeds.

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Students who were challenged to use creativity and business sense to raise as much money as possible from a £10 sum, have raised hundreds more and donated much of it to charity.

The students at the University of Bangor borrowed £10 individually or in small teams and had two weeks to maximise their return in an enterprising way.

Lowri Owen, who coordinated the challenge, explained: “This competition is a valuable way of allowing students to learn about business and creativity in a practical way. The fact that many of them donated some or all of their profits to charities and local organisations was a real bonus.”

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The first study to investigate the chemical structure of an advanced class of anti-wrinkle cream has shown that it could be used to promote wound healing and regenerative medicine.

Chemists at the University of Reading researched the nanostructure of a cosmetic ingredient used in high performance skincare creams – a peptide amphiphile (PA).

Many skincare products use peptides to treat wrinkles. Skin is made up mostly of collagen; it is the foundation that gives your skin its support and thickness. Young people have lots of collagen and taut, smooth skin. In contrast, older people have much less collagen and thin, wrinkled skin.

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Five nations in Africa have come together to create the world’s largest conservation area for wildlife.

Elephants have no respect for lines on a map, especially the artificial national boundaries established by Europeans after carving up Africa into colonial empires. But national boundaries have kept elephants and many other animals cooped up in southern Africa.

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Carbon emissions at sea have received more attention over the last decade. Ports, especially, can have a negative impact on air quality in the populated areas that surround them. The many emissions sources at ports include ships, trucks, trains, and cargo-handling equipment. Harbor-crafts also contribute a significant portion of total port emissions. These include tugboats, ferries, fishing boats, and dredge vessels. Recently, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have started using a hybrid electric tugboat. A new study by the University of California (UC) Riverside has shown that this has been effective at reducing emissions.

Tugboats are typically powered by marine compression ignition engines. The engines are built to be extremely powerful relative to the size of the vessel. Larger tugboats used in deeper waters have power ratings up to 27,000 horse power. They can have a power:tonnage ratio of up to 4.5, similar to engines used in locomotives. These engines typically drive the propellers mechanically rather than converting the output through electric motors, as is done on trains.

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Students in the US have been given a Children’s Courage of Conscience Award for their on-going work creating a giant book about peace.
With 500 double-sided pages measuring 10 feet by 12 feet, and weighing in at one tonne, once completed Pages for Peace will be the world’s biggest book.

Behind the project is a group of children from Groton-Dunstable Regional Middle School, in Groton, Massachusetts. They were presented with the prize by the Peace Abbey, in recognition of their services to peace. Previous recipients of the Courage of Conscience Award include civil rights activist Rosa Parks and Mother Theresa.

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(Reuters) – The World Bank has offered Tanzania an alternative to stop a major road project across the Serengeti national park that conservationists say threatens one of Africa’s biggest wildlife spectacles.

Conservation groups say the government’s planned highway through the northern edge of the Serengeti would hinder the annual migration of some 2 million wildebeest.

The World Bank’s John Murray McIntire said it was ready to help the east African nation in financing an alternative route for the road that would otherwise cut through the park.

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Ants in the Panamanian rain forest could inspire high-tech tools of the future that are strong and can withstand fracture. During the course of his work, University of Oregon research scientist Robert Schofield also discovered that when the ants are no longer capable of doing their job, nature takes care of these displaced workers.

Leaf-cutter ants have powerful blades on either side of their head. These mandibles as sharp as any man-made knife, but wear out over time, according to University of Oregon research scientist Robert Schofield.

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It’s a cold winter day and Ruth Kassinger is eating fresh kumquats that she’s just picked from a tree inside her suburban Washington home. The kumquat is among a variety of tropical plants in the sunroom Kassinger calls her conservatory.

A chance visit to the National Botanic Garden in Washington gave her the idea to build her more modest version. “I walked in and the glass doors opened and I stepped into a beautiful green lush, warm and humid jungle, and I walked around for a while, and was just stunned by how beautiful and full of life this place was.”

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