Positive TV

Green and Eco

Zero Carbon Britain is the flagship research project from the Centre for Alternative Technology, showing that a modern, zero-emissions society is possible using technology available today.

To find out more and get involved visit www.zerocarbonbritain.org

YOUR TREES NEED YOU!

 

The Tree Conference, to be Livestreamed from Glastonbury on Saturday 4 November, highlights the outstanding role of trees and calls for mass mobilisation of tree planting

 

Watch talks with BBC explorer Bruce Parry, tree scientist Diana Beresford-Kroeger, Clare Dubois of TreeSisters, and much more!

 

LESS THAN 5 DAYS TO GO!

 

Much excitement awaits the imminent arrival of The Tree Conference, to be Livestreamed from the Red Brick Building in Glastonbury this Saturday, 4 November, inviting tree lovers across the UK and the world to tune in and join the movement to plant trees, safeguard forests and save our ecosystems.

[continue reading…]

JAKARTA — Young Indonesians are breathing new life into their polluted concrete capital city with little more than buckets of soil and seeds.

A group of mostly young professionals, known as Gardening Indonesia, has joined the global urban farming movement, converting vacant patches of land between Jakarta’s skyscrapers into lush green vegetable gardens.

“There’s concrete, concrete, everywhere. But if we look hard enough, there is vacant land we can farm,” said Sigit Kusumawijaya, 30, watering freshly planted tomato seeds.

[continue reading…]

On Wednesday Iceland flipped the switch on the world’s first power plant that eliminates more CO2 than it produces. The pilot program, which is operated by Climeworks, can remove an estimated 50 metric tons of CO2 from the air each year. The gases aren’t just contained; rather, they are turned into limestone where they will remain for at least one million years.

New source:

https://inhabitat.com/worlds-first-negative-emissions-power-plant-opens-in-iceland/

Five nations in Africa have come together to create the world’s largest conservation area for wildlife.

Elephants have no respect for lines on a map, especially the artificial national boundaries established by Europeans after carving up Africa into colonial empires. But national boundaries have kept elephants and many other animals cooped up in southern Africa.

[continue reading…]

This from CNN:-

London, England (CNN) — The world’s largest offshore wind farm opened Thursday off the British coast, with 100 wind turbines capable of supplying enough electricity for 200,000 homes a year.

The farm, off the coast of Kent in southern England, is part of a major renewable energy initiative spearheaded by the previous British government.

Swedish energy company Vattenfall will operate the farm after having invested around 880 million pounds ($1.38 billion).

[continue reading…]

The world’s largest meat processor has agreed to stop buying beef from ranches associated with slave labor and illegal deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, according to the public prosecutor’s office in the state of Acre. The deal absolves JBS-Friboi from 2 billion reals ($1.3 billion) in potential fines and paves the way for the firm to continue selling meat to companies concerned about their environmental reputation.

The agreement is significant because it was signed by prosecutors from other Amazon states including Rondonia, Amazonas, Roraima, Pará, Tocantins, Maranhão and Amapá. Other cattle giants are expected to follow suit.

[continue reading…]

Carbon emissions at sea have received more attention over the last decade. Ports, especially, can have a negative impact on air quality in the populated areas that surround them. The many emissions sources at ports include ships, trucks, trains, and cargo-handling equipment. Harbor-crafts also contribute a significant portion of total port emissions. These include tugboats, ferries, fishing boats, and dredge vessels. Recently, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have started using a hybrid electric tugboat. A new study by the University of California (UC) Riverside has shown that this has been effective at reducing emissions.

Tugboats are typically powered by marine compression ignition engines. The engines are built to be extremely powerful relative to the size of the vessel. Larger tugboats used in deeper waters have power ratings up to 27,000 horse power. They can have a power:tonnage ratio of up to 4.5, similar to engines used in locomotives. These engines typically drive the propellers mechanically rather than converting the output through electric motors, as is done on trains.

[continue reading…]

The World Bank has launched a global partnership aimed at helping countries include the costs of destroying nature into their national accounts.

Ten nations will take part in the pilot phase, including India and Colombia.

The bank’s president Robert Zoellick said environmental destruction happens partly because governments do not account for the value of nature.

[continue reading…]

The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors has approved funding of a project that aims to enhance government capacity to mitigate climate-related hazards in Nepal by improving the accuracy and timeliness of weather and flood forecasts and warnings for climate-vulnerable communities.

Funded by a Strategic Climate Fund grant of US$16 million, and a Strategic Climate Fund Loan of US$15 million, the project project also aims to develop agricultural management information system services to help farmers mitigate climate-related production risks.

[continue reading…]

(Reuters) – The World Bank has offered Tanzania an alternative to stop a major road project across the Serengeti national park that conservationists say threatens one of Africa’s biggest wildlife spectacles.

Conservation groups say the government’s planned highway through the northern edge of the Serengeti would hinder the annual migration of some 2 million wildebeest.

The World Bank’s John Murray McIntire said it was ready to help the east African nation in financing an alternative route for the road that would otherwise cut through the park.

[continue reading…]

Ants in the Panamanian rain forest could inspire high-tech tools of the future that are strong and can withstand fracture. During the course of his work, University of Oregon research scientist Robert Schofield also discovered that when the ants are no longer capable of doing their job, nature takes care of these displaced workers.

Leaf-cutter ants have powerful blades on either side of their head. These mandibles as sharp as any man-made knife, but wear out over time, according to University of Oregon research scientist Robert Schofield.

[continue reading…]