Positive TV

Science

Scientists have discovered a new way of detecting zinc in zebra fish, that could pave the way for furthering our understanding of diseases like type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer and Alzheimer’s.

Zinc is found throughout the body and involved in many metabolic pathways that affect the function of the immune system and brain, reproduction, and sexual development.

It is also increasingly recognised as a key element in the treatment of a range of diseases, for example type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. It’s unclear whether zinc is a cause of disease, or if it’s employed to prevent its development or progression, and there is great interest in developing a molecular probe which can detect zinc in the body.

[continue reading…]

TAIPEI, Taiwan — A giant panda, one of a pair presented by China four years ago to mark warming ties with Taiwan, has given birth to a female cub at a Taipei zoo, officials said Sunday.

The 9-year-old Yuan Yuan delivered the cub Saturday night, following artificial insemination given in March, the zoo announced.

It was the seventh such attempt on Yuan Yuan in three years, they said. Natural pregnancy among pandas is relatively rare.
[continue reading…]

The first study to investigate the chemical structure of an advanced class of anti-wrinkle cream has shown that it could be used to promote wound healing and regenerative medicine.

Chemists at the University of Reading researched the nanostructure of a cosmetic ingredient used in high performance skincare creams – a peptide amphiphile (PA).

Many skincare products use peptides to treat wrinkles. Skin is made up mostly of collagen; it is the foundation that gives your skin its support and thickness. Young people have lots of collagen and taut, smooth skin. In contrast, older people have much less collagen and thin, wrinkled skin.

[continue reading…]

Five nations in Africa have come together to create the world’s largest conservation area for wildlife.

Elephants have no respect for lines on a map, especially the artificial national boundaries established by Europeans after carving up Africa into colonial empires. But national boundaries have kept elephants and many other animals cooped up in southern Africa.

[continue reading…]

Carbon emissions at sea have received more attention over the last decade. Ports, especially, can have a negative impact on air quality in the populated areas that surround them. The many emissions sources at ports include ships, trucks, trains, and cargo-handling equipment. Harbor-crafts also contribute a significant portion of total port emissions. These include tugboats, ferries, fishing boats, and dredge vessels. Recently, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach have started using a hybrid electric tugboat. A new study by the University of California (UC) Riverside has shown that this has been effective at reducing emissions.

Tugboats are typically powered by marine compression ignition engines. The engines are built to be extremely powerful relative to the size of the vessel. Larger tugboats used in deeper waters have power ratings up to 27,000 horse power. They can have a power:tonnage ratio of up to 4.5, similar to engines used in locomotives. These engines typically drive the propellers mechanically rather than converting the output through electric motors, as is done on trains.

[continue reading…]

The World Bank has launched a global partnership aimed at helping countries include the costs of destroying nature into their national accounts.

Ten nations will take part in the pilot phase, including India and Colombia.

The bank’s president Robert Zoellick said environmental destruction happens partly because governments do not account for the value of nature.

[continue reading…]

Ants in the Panamanian rain forest could inspire high-tech tools of the future that are strong and can withstand fracture. During the course of his work, University of Oregon research scientist Robert Schofield also discovered that when the ants are no longer capable of doing their job, nature takes care of these displaced workers.

Leaf-cutter ants have powerful blades on either side of their head. These mandibles as sharp as any man-made knife, but wear out over time, according to University of Oregon research scientist Robert Schofield.

[continue reading…]

It’s a cold winter day and Ruth Kassinger is eating fresh kumquats that she’s just picked from a tree inside her suburban Washington home. The kumquat is among a variety of tropical plants in the sunroom Kassinger calls her conservatory.

A chance visit to the National Botanic Garden in Washington gave her the idea to build her more modest version. “I walked in and the glass doors opened and I stepped into a beautiful green lush, warm and humid jungle, and I walked around for a while, and was just stunned by how beautiful and full of life this place was.”

[continue reading…]

Wind turbines are an increasingly popular way to generate clean energy with large-scale wind farms springing up all over the world. However, many residents near proposed wind farm sites have raised concerns over the aesthetics and the low frequency vibrations they claim are generated by wind turbines. An interesting Windstalk concept devised by New York design firm Atelier DNA could overcome both these problems while still allowing a comparable amount of electricity to be generated by the wind.

[continue reading…]

New research shows that wind turbines may help corn and soybean crops stay cooler and dryer, help them fend off fungal infestations and improve their ability to extract growth-enhancing carbon dioxide from the air and soil

AMES, Iowa—Wind turbines in Midwestern farm fields may be doing more than churning out electricity. The giant turbine blades that generate renewable energy might also help corn and soybean crops stay cooler and dryer, help them fend off fungal infestations and improve their ability to extract growth-enhancing carbon dioxide [CO2] from the air and soil.

[continue reading…]

Towards the end of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series, the dolphins abandon Earth for another dimension with the farewell message: “So long, and thanks for all the fish.”

While the intelligence of many whale and dolphin species has been attested for decades, a comprehensive study suggests that collectively they may be even brighter than we thought. So perhaps the scenario imagined by Douglas Adams is not as fantastic as it sounds.

Some of the animals turn out to be so good at co-opting humans and other species that one has to wonder what else they are plotting. Whales and dolphins appear to have followed an evolutionary course that is remarkably similar to humans’, with stable, close-knit tribes giving rise to their own languages and cultures and fostering ever bigger and more sophisticated brains.
[continue reading…]

Thanks to Voive of America for this story.

The United States and other nations say they are committed to a greener future. That’s been helped in recent years with millions of dollars of investment in cleaner fuels technology – and as VOA’s Rebecca Ward reports, the investment seems to be paying off.

The winner of a $5 million prize for the best production-capable vehicle that’s able to run the equivalent of 160 kilometers without recharging is – surprisingly – not electric.  The Very Light Car runs on ethanol based E85. It has an internal combustion engine, like a regular automobile.  But the VLC is anything but regular. Brad Jaeger, an engineer on the Edison 2 team, describes its features.

[continue reading…]