Having a positive impact: University of Manchester students clean up their communities

More than 200 students are to take to the streets of south Manchester to clean up their communities – and make a difference.

They will take part in the latest stage of Operation Impact, a large scale volunteering initiative designed by The University of Manchester to reflect the positive contribution students make in their neighbourhoods.

Lindsay Gilbert, Head of Volunteering and Community Engagement at the university, said:  “We decided to run a spring Operation Impact following the success of the last event in November.  All of the projects aim to have a long-term and sustainable impact on the community.”

The initiative is aimed at helping students understand the importance of leadership that embraces social, economic and environmental sustainability, as well as providing them with skills that will boost their employability.

More than 50volunteers will help renovate Healthy Ardwick, a local charity addressing health deprivation, to make it more welcoming and accessible. They will dig up borders, create new flower beds, fix pathways and improve the gardens.   An additional 50 of them will refresh the gardens, prime and paint the railings at Will Griffiths Court in Moss Side. It provides sheltered accommodation to around 30 older residents, but desperately needs a makeover.

Read the full story on the Optemist’s website

Thanks to Simon Meadows

More than 200 students are to take to the streets of south Manchester to clean up their communities – and make a difference.

They will take part in the latest stage of Operation Impact, a large scale volunteering initiative designed by The University of Manchester to reflect the positive contribution students make in their neighbourhoods.

Lindsay Gilbert, Head of Volunteering and Community Engagement at the university, said:  “We decided to run a spring Operation Impact following the success of the last event in November.  All of the projects aim to have a long-term and sustainable impact on the community.”

The initiative is aimed at helping students understand the importance of leadership that embraces social, economic and environmental sustainability, as well as providing them with skills that will boost their employability.

More than 50volunteers will help renovate Healthy Ardwick, a local charity addressing health deprivation, to make it more welcoming and accessible. They will dig up borders, create new flower beds, fix pathways and improve the gardens.   An additional 50 of them will refresh the gardens, prime and paint the railings at Will Griffiths Court in Moss Side. It provides sheltered accommodation to around 30 older residents, but desperately needs a makeover.

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