Positive TV

Education

Households across the country are putting solar panels on their roofs at a rate that has exceeded all expectations. This year we hit 1 million rooftops with photovoltaic (PV) solar panels, up from just 8,000 in 2007. This means that a staggering 2.6 million Australians, 11 percent of the population, are now using the sun to power their homes.

The solar energy revolution is being led in suburbs and towns like Dubbo and Campbelltown in NSW, Bundaberg in Queensland, Hoppers Crossing in Melbourne, and Mandurah in Western Australia. This increase is being driven by ordinary Australians. It is the modest outer metropolitan suburbs across the country, with high concentrations of mortgages, which show the greatest uptake.

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Researchers say that the recent spell of warm weather has seen a rapid increase in jellyfish blooms around Britain’s coasts.

The long, cold spring meant there were very few reports before June.

The Marine Conservation Society (MCS) now says several species including the Lion’s Mane are being reported in rapidly growing numbers.

This particular species has a powerful sting and scientists are advising people not to touch them.
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Within the next year, New York is preparing to roll out an ambitious plan to get residents and businesses to separate their food waste from other trash — initially on a voluntary basis — as they do their paper, metal, glass and plastics.

But already, more than 180 cities and local governments in 18 states offer curbside pickup of food scraps. Now, as Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced on Monday the expansion of the city’s pilot program for food waste recycling, those communities may offer lessons to New York as it tries to catch up.

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Tree loss in one of the world’s largest rainforests has slowed, a study suggests.

Satellite images of Africa’s Congo Basin reveal that deforestation has fallen by about a third since 2000.

Researchers believe this is partly because of a focus on mining and oil rather than commercial agriculture, where swathes of forest are cleared.

The work is published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

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This excellent list includes long time friend of PositiveTV – Steve Killelea – Founder and Executive Chairman of the Institute for Economics and Peace (creator of the Global Peace Index) – Well Done Steve!

In 2011, at least 526,000 people died violent deaths around the world.  Over three-quarters of these occurred in non-conflict settings. A wide range of people around the globe are working to change this depressing reality. But who are these men and women who have dedicated their lives to making the world a safer place? Members of AOAV staff have come together to select 100 people who are outstanding examples of those trying to change the world for the better.

Read the full article on AOAV.org.uk here

Distant Quakes Trigger Tremors at U.S. Waste-Injection Sites

This post excerpts the releases for two new important articles in the journal Science. The first is “Enhanced Remote Earthquake Triggering at Fluid-Injection Sites in the Midwestern United States” (subs. req’d). The second is a review article, “Injection-Induced Earthquakes” (subs. req’d) by U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist William Ellsworth. The first release, from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, explains:

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OMAHA, Neb. — A free online course that starts Monday will offer students the chance to learn about giving from Warren Buffett and help decide how to spend more than $100,000 of his sister’s money.

More than 4,000 people have already signed up for the course that will also feature philanthropic advice from baseball legend Cal Ripken Jr. and the founders of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield. Boston Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner and journalist Soledad O’Brien are other featured guests. The amount being given away could grow if more students sign up.

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DELHI — With less than a year left for national elections, the government of India is out to appease the country’s poor.

Earlier this month, the government used its emergency powers to force through the Food Security Ordinance, which it says will help legally codify the right to food. This is seen as the first step to implementing a law that will allow 800 million Indians to buy food grain at incredibly low prices — the world’s biggest food subsidy program.

This effort of the government may look egalitarian, but there are remaining questions, concerns and divisions within India on the form of this proposed law, who it covers and whether the country can afford it.

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The frenzy over kale has turned from foodie buzz to eater roar. Around the country everyone is talking about kale. As a physician, nothing could please me more. Kale represents an important lesson for all us eaters about the power of food choices to transform our health. Sure, let’s disclose my bias right away. My new book 50 Shades of Kale (Harper/Wave 2013,) co-authored with Chef Jennifer Iserloh, is just out. It is a gorgeous tribute to our muse kale and at its core a food prescription aimed to improve your brain health.

So what’s all the kale hype about?

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TAIPEI, Taiwan — A giant panda, one of a pair presented by China four years ago to mark warming ties with Taiwan, has given birth to a female cub at a Taipei zoo, officials said Sunday.

The 9-year-old Yuan Yuan delivered the cub Saturday night, following artificial insemination given in March, the zoo announced.

It was the seventh such attempt on Yuan Yuan in three years, they said. Natural pregnancy among pandas is relatively rare.
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Although there are many other notable initiatives today, the influence of urban farming is uniquely widespread because more people live in cities than rural areas and food is a central necessity that affects everything at once. The seeds of change are already being planted in homes like mine across the world. For these seeds to grow and blossom, we need to demand more local food so that the market for urban-grown produce expands. We also need to put pressure on our legal system to allow easier local trade and more local food production.

I love suburbia not for what it is, but for what it could be. While most other houses on my street have grass lawns, my yard sprouts zucchinis, tomatoes, pomegranates, kale, spinach, apples, figs, guavas, almonds, garlic, onion, strawberries, and more. Over 500 plant species all in all. We grow more than 3000 pounds of food per year on a plot of land the size of a basketball court—enough fruits and vegetables to feed my family of four year-round. Our house is part of a growing global movement of people involved in urban farming.

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The importance of giving

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we turn our collective focus on gratitude and the importance of giving back.

Mother Teresa once said, “If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.” This simple truth serves as an important reminder that even a small act of kindness can make a big difference in the life of someone in need.

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